Saturday, 16 March 2013

In his News article last week he is pledging 'new money' for highways repairs, by abstaining on the budget vote his team almost missed £6M of real 'New Money' for road repairs.

It seems a decent pledge, take the £4M from second home Council Tax Discounts and spend it building Council Houses, except that the budget which went through included the removal of the discount on second homes saving 175 jobs.

Peter Jackson on budget day put forward the Tory plan to introduce performance related pay for some employees, after the Council has had to spend tens of millions introducing a national agreement on equality and equal pay (Single Status)due to some peoples pay having performance related bonuses attached.

In his News article last week he is pledging 'new money' for highways repairs, by abstaining on the budget vote his team almost missed £6M of real 'New Money' for road repairs.

He is still spouting on about Wind Turbine regulations, something he didn't take any notice of when he applied twice to place some on his own land then was not very truthful about it.

He also still has to come clean about whether his team have agreed consensus opinion of planning matters surrounding Opencast and Wind Turbine planning applications, Northumberland's working population and commercial enterprise such as UK Coal and Border Wind need to know if Northumberland Tories wish to cut business off from expansion?

Northumberland Labour Group have worked up a plan to develop 1300 Affordable, Social and Intermediate homes over the next four years and have a program in place that doesn't rely on paying off staff or attacking their national terms and conditions. It will also kickstart Northumberland economy creating 500 Jobs in the construction sector, offer the opportunity for craft apprenticeships and safeguard 3000 jobs in the supply and retail sector.

Labour Group will also introduce free parking but wish to harvest local knowledge and work with Town and Parish Councils to ensure everyones views are taken into consideration.


Labour is aware of the diverse levels of wealth and poverty across Northumberland and how poverty is increasing through the Coalition Governments cuts and austerity measures. Labour also understands how easily approximately two thirds of its population can travel into the Tyne and Wear conurbation or Carlisle to spend. We want to keep our communities sustainable and increase tourism and trade from the conurbation. One of the ways to achieve this is free parking for all. We believe this is an income cut worth taking to assist Northumberland.
 Approximately half of Northumberland’s population live in the South East of the County with its mixture of all day free or two hour limited parking.


We will of course ask Town and Parish Councils to produce local parking plans. We will urge Parish Councils to come up with innovative solutions that see parking charges as a last resort, not the easiest fix.


Northumberland has a rapidly aging mobile population who can shop from Monday to Friday and it should be possible for some areas to remove or time limit parking on those days when pressure on space is reduced, or to produce seasonal parking plans that reflect the ebb and flow of tourist traffic in most our beautiful towns and villages.
Council has evidence that removing charges can increase casual retail trade in rural towns by two thirds we want local businesses to benefit from those changes.


Northumberland Labour County Council Candidate for Druridge Bay Ward Scott Dickinson said: “We can’t trust Northumberland Tories to safely manage our economy or help those in greatest need in Northumberland. They have simply taken Labour’s ideas and are trying to sell them as their own. It isn’t twelve moths since their place was for £15 per car per annum ‘free parking’ across the whole of the County. This latest pledge is just Councillor Jackson lips blowing in the wind.”

Villagers voice fury at evening bus service axe

Villagers voice fury at evening bus service axe
Brenda Trobe, Ian Patience and Keith Trobe with the petition about bus services in Felton.
Northumberland Gazette
Published on Thursday 14 March 2013 09:19
Hundreds of residents in a north Northumberland village have signed a petition calling for the reinstatement of an axed evening bus service.
Almost 250 people in Felton have backed the fight to try to force Arriva into a u-turn over recent changes made to the X15.
Last month, the company withdrew the 8.43pm Monday to Saturday journey from Newcastle to Alnwick, which stopped in the village en route.
Now, the final X15 on these days, which runs from the city to north Northumberland, leaves Newcastle at 6.43pm and stops in Felton at 7.42pm.
Arriva says the later journey was axed because it was unsustainable and wasn’t well used.
Residents believe otherwise and say it is having an impact.
Brenda Trobe, who started the petition, said: “This affects people who work in Morpeth and Newcastle or who want to use adult education classes or youth and community activities in the evening.
“The long-term danger is that as services on a route are reduced, you can get to a point where the whole route becomes untenable. We’ve seen that happen elsewhere and don’t want that to happen to Felton.”
Mrs Trobe has already written to Arriva asking them to reinstate the route and has requested a meeting between the company and villagers, but says she is still waiting for an answer.
The petition, which was put in three local shops and signed by 249 people in just a week, will be sent to Arriva shortly.

Friday, 15 March 2013

YOUNGSTERS in Northumberland have been given a helping hand to get their skates on.

Plans to get a skate park are given a cash boost

Coun Milburn Douglas, Amber Hume, Tracey Davidson, Joanne Hannay from Rio Tinto, Karen Manian and Daniel Hume, 13, on his BMX. Coun Milburn Douglas, Amber Hume, Tracey Davidson, Joanne Hannay from Rio Tinto, Karen Manian and Daniel Hume, 13, on his BMX.
YOUNGSTERS in Northumberland have been given a helping hand to get their skates on.

Rio Tinto Alcan has donated £1,000 to kick-start fundraising efforts to build a skate park at Lynemouth Recreation Ground.
Children currently have to travel to facilities in neighbouring villages or as far away as Newcastle if they want to practice their inline skating, scooter and BMX tricks.
A volunteer group of parents and grandparents recently joined together to coordinate fundraising efforts, and it is hoped the donation will encourage other local businesses and charitable organisations to come forward and donate funds and materials.
Local mum Amber Hume, is a spokesperson for the Lynemouth Skate Park Working Group.
She said: “We have a lot of children in the village between eight and 16 years-old who have a passion for using skateboard parks, whether they are on their BMX or scooter but they have no place to call their own.
“As a local community we decided to do something about it.
“We don’t want our kids having to ride their bikes or skate near busy main roads to use facilities outside the area.
“It’s still early days and we are delighted to have Rio Tinto’s support, which has helped to get the fund up and running.
“The kids have been really keen to help too.
“They’ve hosted cake sales, fancy dress parties and a disco to raise money and we’re also applying for a grant through the Big Lottery Fund.”
The group need to generate in the region of £85,000 for the design, materials and build, with a wish list that includes a half-pipe, quarter pipe, handrails and ramps.
Rio Tinto’s regional economic development assistant, Joanne Hannay, added: “When we received the request for assistance through our charitable fund with the Tyne and Wear and Northumberland Community Foundation we loved the idea.
“A facility like this will benefit Lynemouth village and the youngsters who live here for generations to come.”

Thursday, 14 March 2013

Although it is widely rumoured he has no intention of standing in the May elections, Coun. Bradbury would only comment: “We have not released our list of candidates yet.”

Councillor denies house move
By ROBERT GIBSON
Hexham Courant
Last updated at 15:21, Thursday, 14 March 2013
UNCERTAINTY remains over the political future of Tynedale’s most prominent county councillor, as he refused to be drawn this week on whether he would defend his seat in the forthcoming elections.
Coun. Neil Bradbury, who represents Prudhoe West and is a member of the ruling Liberal Democrat executive, has been plagued in recent weeks by allegations that he has moved to Blaydon, with residents finding it difficult to contact him.
He has not turned up to a town council meeting since October and his attendance at County Hall in Morpeth was lacking for several months – although it has picked up since.
Although it is widely rumoured he has no intention of standing in the May elections, Coun. Bradbury would only comment: “We have not released our list of candidates yet.”
The alleged move to Blaydon – now flatly denied by Coun. Bradbury – was raised several weeks ago by town councillors before being brought up at Northumberland County Council’s west area by Coun. Glenn Simpson.
At the time, Coun. Bradbury released a statement saying his home was still in Prudhoe and he continued to serve his residents as normal.
But at the most recent Prudhoe Town Council meeting, Coun. Simpson said: “He still hasn’t answered the particular question put to him and I doubt he is going to.
“It’s rumoured that he is planning to step down and I have also had a county council official say to me that the contact in Prudhoe West is through this town council.
“You can read into that what you want.”
Coun. Simpson added that it was “quite clear” the contact details featured on the county council website for Coun. Bradbury were incorrect.
Town mayor Coun. Tony Reid even suggested Coun. Bradbury was “on a sinking ship”, adding: “I don’t have any sympathy for him and if he’s leaving, that’s better for Prudhoe.”
Speaking afterwards, however, Coun. Bradbury said there was no truth whatsoever in the rumour he had moved.
“I am in my old home; I am still living there,” he said.
“My house is on the market. I am trying to sell it, but I have not sold it yet.”
He added that he spoke to county council officers every day about Prudhoe issues and was dealing with plenty of case work from the town.
Dismissing the recent comments about him as “silly party politics”, he continued: “I am perfectly happy with how I do my job.
“If people in my ward were unhappy with the service I was giving them as a councillor, then I’d be really upset.
“That’s what I’ve always been about; but every day I’m dealing with a different piece of case work for residents.”
First published at 07:38, Wednesday, 13 March 2013

It could be our last word on this news story but then may be ???

‘Rip Van Reid’ says ‘sorry’ (I fell asleep on the job and wasted 5 years of opportunities for Blyth)
Anybody who has heard Jeff Reid’s ‘crocodile tears’ today after he was caught red-handed calling his own town a ‘dump’ should consider the following points
1.    Jeff Reid has run the council that has allowed Blyth to deteriorate for the last 5 years. He’s been asleep on the job.
2.    Jeff Reid has been happy to pass out the council goodies (even announcing Blyth was a ‘dump’ in a meeting where he was announcing more investment for Hexham) ignoring towns like Blyth.
3.    The Liberals led by Jeff Reid are bragging today about £250,000 investment for rural areas so the residents of Blyth are entitled to ask ‘what about us’?
4.    Jeff Reid’s Liberal Democrats are raking in nearly £5m from car parking fees around the county but it’s not being spent on towns like Blyth.
5.    Liberal Democrat Northumberland is spending over £14m a year on IT including some consultants ‘earning’ £850 per day and yet he’s allowed Blyth to become ‘a dump’ ( Jeff’s words not ours)
The truth is Jeff Reid is taking Blyth for granted and he’s taking the mick. He’s complaining about his town but he’s forgetting to own up to his 5 years asleep on the job.
Jeff Reid is well paid and he can afford to ‘jump in his car’ and travel to Cramlington to shop but he’s forgetting to tell people about his role in the decline of Blyth.
5 Years of Jeff Reid, asleep on the job, ignoring Blyth and the South East and treating the town with such disrespect.
Jeff Reid has just said on Tyne Tees ‘I wish I could go back in time and take back what I said’.
We say now Blyth knows what he really thinks about the place he’s had 5 years to change.
‘Rip Van Reid’ the council leader who fell asleep on the job, the man who wishes he could go back in time. 
Sorry is an easy word for Jeff Reid but what he should be apologising for is 5 years of wasted chances for Blyth
Blyth must ask itself – Can it afford 5 more years of Jeff Reid’s inaction and disrespect or should it ‘dump’ him
Vote Labour on 2 May

Coun Dickinson, who is also a Northumbria Police and Crime Commissioner panel member, said that crimes like this were why areas of north Northumberland need a say on the panel.

Fury as thieves take timber from new allotment site


Councillor Scott Dickinson at the allotments in North Broomhill where fencing has been stolen. Councillor Scott Dickinson at the allotments in North Broomhill where fencing has been stolen.

A community allotment site, which is not even fully open, has been targeted by thieves, to the anger of the parish council chairman.

Around £1,500-worth of timber, from an entire length of the fence, has been stolen from the site in North Broomhill.
The allotments have been developed on a patch of wasteland by East Chevington Parish Council in partnership with local farmers.
And council chairman Scott Dickinson described the theft as ‘an utter disgrace’.
“We have responded to the need because of the long waiting list for allotments,” he said.
“It was local people who wanted it and somebody feels it’s okay to come down and steal a full strip of fencing. It’s unbelievable.”
Thanks to the alertness of the public, some of the timber has been found and recovered, but police are still investigating the theft.
Coun Dickinson, who is also a Northumbria Police and Crime Commissioner panel member, said that crimes like this were why areas of north Northumberland need a say on the panel.
“It might not seem much to some, but rural crime is different to urban crime,” he said.
“Incidents like this have a larger impact than people might think.
“And for a small parish council budget, it’s a lot of money.”
Anyone with any information into the thefts is asked to contact police on 101 ext 69191.

Wednesday, 13 March 2013

“You talk about the A1 – you haven’t got the route planned, you don’t know the cost of it and you haven’t put the effort into it. But you like to talk it up and so does your MP for Berwick,” he said.

Cut, cut, cut and nothing else, say Labour

Labour Group Leader Coun Grant Davey at Blyth's Isabella Centre. Labour Group Leader Coun Grant Davey at Blyth's Isabella Centre.
In the Liberal Democrat county council ‘very little has happened at all apart from cut, cut, cut’, Labour group leader Coun Grant Davey said.

“In 2008, you had 8,500 kids in poverty, now it’s 11,000. Some 6,100 were on the housing waiting list, now it’s nearly 12,000.
“You have paid off 1,500 bread-winners from families in the last five years.
“I hope you are proud of that, because I think it’s absolutely disgraceful.”
The county had inherited money from a district council for a leisure centre and still did not have it off the ground.
“You talk about the A1 – you haven’t got the route planned, you don’t know the cost of it and you haven’t put the effort into it. But you like to talk it up and so does your MP for Berwick,” he said.
“We want to protect frontline services, we want to build hundreds of homes, we want to fix the potholes – proper road renewal.”
The first thing Labour would do after the May election was tackle the parish councils’ worries about dwindling income as many households would no longer be yielding council tax.
This year the county is passing on to parishes a more than £600,000 one-off transition grant from the Government, but there is no commitment to future aid.

Fightback starts here say folk of beleaguered Blyth after Jeff calls his home town a DUMP

Fightback starts here say folk of beleaguered Blyth

Folk in beleaguered Blyth were today urged to  restore civic pride  in the wake of "embarrassing" comments made by a senior councillor
Northumberland County Council leader Jeff Reid

Northumberland County Council leader Jeff Reid sparked an outcry last week after describing his home town  as “a dump.”
Now people, businesses and organisations in the town are being urged to use the negative publicity generated by the row as motivation to get behind a local regeneration group and its improvement plans.
The rallying cry was made by  businessman Steven Bradley who chairs the Blyth Town Team – an organisation which has been given £10,000 in Government funding to kickstart plans to rejuvenate the port community.
Coun Reid, who represents Blyth on the county council, sparked fury by saying he travels to Cramlington to shop, because Blyth is “a dump”.
He later admitted his comments had been a mistake.
Now Mr Bradley, who runs Widescope Web Design, said Coun Reid’s “embarrassing” remark is in danger of overshadowing the good work being done in the town.
He said it should now be seen as an opportunity to push forward plans to restore some much-needed pride in the town.
“It has all been very, very negative and the comments were taken badly, especially by local businesses. However, I’m hoping we will be able to get something out of this because it has started a debate and brought people out of the woodwork with ideas and offers of help.
“A lot of people have been in touch to say they would like to get involved with the Town Team or made suggestions about what needs to be done in Blyth. It has also opened doors to meetings with Jeff Reid and other local councillors.
“It affected morale, especially coming from someone who represents us on the council. However, everyone makes mistakes and it is about how they react afterwards. We hope this will achieve something in the long run for Blyth.”
Mr Bradley said the town should take pride in the recent success of Blyth Town FC winning the £100,000 first prize in a national community football competition, and fundraising efforts by local charities to support the work of volunteers running community centres, leisure facilities, dance groups and sports clubs. “This is the true face of Blyth, and now it is the time for our duly elected to work with us to make it even better. As a person who has lived in Blyth my entire life, I am sick of hearing about Blyth in a negative light, without serious solutions being put forward as a response. It’s time to pull together and have some serious conversations about the future of Blyth.”
The Town Team’s work will include helping to create a definitive database of local shops and businesses and a survey to find out the concerns of businesses, community groups and charities. As well as boosting trade and business in Blyth, it also aims to support projects to improve local community.

Tuesday, 12 March 2013

Labour Group Leader Grant Davey said: “Over the last five years communities have been crying out for affordable homes and we’ve listened.

Hundreds of affordable homes pledged


A PLEDGE to build hundreds of affordable homes across Northumberland has been given by county politicians.

The Northumberland Labour group says it will support the development of 1,300 homes over four years if it takes control of the county council following May’s election.
Members have identified Morpeth as one of the areas for development, and they say they will not touch the county’s green belt, with brownfield sites identified as the preferred option.
The Party says the initiative could create at least 500 construction jobs a year and will help to maintain 3,000 jobs in the supply chain, while a craft apprentice training scheme would be set up.
Labour Group Leader Grant Davey said: “Over the last five years communities have been crying out for affordable homes and we’ve listened.
“Our plans would build at least 1,300 new affordable homes over the next four years, which would create new jobs and support existing ones.
“If the people of Northumberland elect a Labour majority in the council chamber on May 2 we will bring forward detailed plans to kick-start the Northumberland economy through the most ambitious affordable house-building programme in the county for over 40 years within the first 100 days.”
The plan is to use prudential borrowing to enable Homes for Northumberland to build the properties, with the council borrowing the money, then lending it out for house building and recouping it over 25 years.
The authority’s arms-length regeneration company Arch, which the Labour group says has assets of more than £60million, would also be encouraged to expand the use of its immediate housing stock and assist in buying void and hard-to-sell properties for rent.
A new Housing Need Survey from the council suggests that at least 240 new homes are needed each year over the next decade to ease the housing waiting list, which is estimated to be between 11,500 and 12,300 people.

Monday, 11 March 2013

Coun Dickinson described the explanation as ‘an absolute joke’ and said he would like someone from Arriva to attend the next meeting.

East Chevington Parish Council


Students Shannon Hewitson, Brodie Fisher, Billy Jury, Lauren Taylor, Jade Milne, Stacey Murray, Liam Morris with Coun Scott Dickinson. Students Shannon Hewitson, Brodie Fisher, Billy Jury, Lauren Taylor, Jade Milne, Stacey Murray, Liam Morris with Coun Scott Dickinson.

Call for bosses to explain bus service changes

Bosses of bus company Arriva are being invited to meet villagers it has bypassed without warning.
The first that commuters knew of the number 20’s diversion was when it failed to turn up at the bus stop where they were waiting to go to work and college, parish councillors heard.
Members hope they can persuade the company to reverse the service cut, which also affects Amble Links Estate. They have now launched a petition to demonstrate the strength of local feeling.
Cutting out Hadston Square shaves about 90 seconds from the journey to Ashington, but imposes an impossible trek to the main road on people who have difficulty walking, chairman Coun Scott Dickinson said.
In response to the council’s protest, Arriva’s head of commercial development Paul de Santis said the change had been made to improve the service’s reliability.
Coun Dickinson described the explanation as ‘an absolute joke’ and said he would like someone from Arriva to attend the next meeting.
“We have got elderly people with mobility issues that can’t get from the Precinct up to the top of the road who are now excluded from using public transport. We have got people using taxis from the shop to the top of the road just to use the bus.”
Some people could not reach their doctor’s surgery.
“The impact has been huge. The information to residents was non-existent,” he said.
Coun Fred Thurgood said inquiries were directed to Luton. “The decisions are being made by people with no relevance to this area, who have no idea what’s going on.”
Coun Dickinson said: “If they had run some kind of consultation, they would have understood the impact on people. It’s not just a case of people not wanting to walk to the top of the road: it’s a case that people physically can not.”
l Students from Hadston House Foundation Learning have been carrying out a research project and looked at the recent changes to the bus services axed from the village they either live in or attend daily.

Sunday, 10 March 2013

Labour group leader on the county council, Coun. Grant Davey, said: “Over the last five years, communities have been crying out for affordable homes and we’ve listened.

Labour unveils housing boom

THE biggest social house-building programme since the end of the Second World War could be on the way for Tynedale.
The Labour Party has pledged to build more than 450 new affordable homes in the district if it gains a working majority in May’s county council elections.
Labour has identified 21 towns and villages across the district for housing schemes, ranging from just a couple in some villages to more than 40 in others.
The biggest proposed developments are at Ponteland (55), Prudhoe (46), Allendale (45) and Corbridge (39).
Other major sites would be at Ovingham (32), Bellingham (26), and Stocksfield (26).
Smaller communities lined up for development include Tarset (8) and Rochester (6).
Labour claims the massive building programme would not only help to tackle the county’s chronic shortage of affordable homes, but would also create 500 construction jobs every year, and help to secure another 3,000 jobs in the supply chain.
While no details of specific sites have been given, because of potential ownership issues, development would take place on previously developed land, known as brownfield sites.
The party has pledged no development would encroach onto any green field sites.
However, Labour could be on collision course with council planning policies, which frown on housing development in villages lacking certain facilities and infrastructure.
There could also be resistance to mass developments in areas where sewerage services, water supplies and doctor’s surgeries are already tautly stretched.
Labour group leader on the county council, Coun. Grant Davey, said: “Over the last five years, communities have been crying out for affordable homes and we’ve listened.
“Our plans would build at least 1,300 new affordable homes over the next four years which would create new jobs and support existing ones.
“If the people of Northumberland elect a Labour majority in the council chamber on May 2, we will bring forward detailed plans to kickstart the Northumberland economy through the most ambitious affordable house-building programme in the county for over 40 years, within the first 100 days.”
The 451 Tynedale homes are included in a proposed programme which would see affordable homes built across the county as a whole during the four-year life of a Labour administration.
Northumberland’s latest housing needs survey revealed the council needed to build at least 240 homes per year over the next 10 years to make inroads into its housing waiting list.
The innovative plan would see Labour supporting Homes for Northumberland and the county housing associations by using prudential borrowing to enable homes to be built on an “invest to save” model.
It means the authority would borrow the cash, and then lend it out to build the homes, recouping the loan over 25 years.
The plans also include encouraging Arch, the council’s arms-length regeneration partner, to expand use of its intermediate housing stock, as well as assisting through the purchase of void and hard to sell properties, moving them into the intermediate rental market.
The scheme would see the creation of at least 350 new build, affordable homes per year for the next four years, which would create at least 500 construction jobs each year.
Labour will begin with a craft apprentice training scheme linked to the construction phase to raise the skills base of the communities involved.
Labour failed to win a single seat in Tynedale on the county council in the last elections in 2008, and is presently the smallest of the major parties on the council.
However, the party is expected to make a strong comeback in the May elections following its worst ever showing at the polls five years ago.
The council is presently hung, with no party in overall control, although the Lib Dems operate a minority administration.
The location and number of houses in each of the 21 named parishes is: Acomb (17); Allendale (45); Barrasford (16); Bellingham ( 26); Chollerford (14); Corbridge (39); Fourstones (6); Halt-whistle (19); Haydon Bridge (10); Hexham (17); Mickley Square (22); Newbrough (10); Otterburn (15); Ovingham ( 32); Ponteland (55); Prudhoe (46); Rochester (6) Stocksfield (26); Tarset (8); Wark (20); West Woodburn (2).

And although Coun. Bradbury maintains he is still available to deal with residents’ problems, and can be contacted via the county council website, town councillors have concerns.

Prudhoe’s still my home’
WITH an election just round the corner, questions have been raised about the future of Tynedale’s most prominent county councillor.
Coun. Neil Bradbury, the district’s only representative on the ruling Lib Dem executive at County Hall, has not been seen at his home in Prudhoe for several weeks.
It is understood the house is on the market, but has not yet been sold, amid reports that he has moved to Blaydon.
And although Coun. Bradbury maintains he is still available to deal with residents’ problems, and can be contacted via the county council website, town councillors have concerns.
Town councillor Glenn Simpson, who brought matter of the alleged move to the town council’s attention, said: “Coun. Bradbury deals with tourism on the council; he’s promoting the county and it appears he doesn’t even live there.”
Town councillor, Coun. Jennifer McGee, said: “I think, as a county councillor, you need to be living in the town you represent.”
Coun. Bradbury did attend Tuesday’s meeting of the county council’s west area committee, where his availability to the public was questioned by Coun. Simpson.
Coun. Bradbury insisted he remained contactable, but no longer answered calls from one individual who rang him up to eight times per day.
Coun. Bradbury could not be contacted by telephone this week, but in a statement sent by email, he said: “I’ve been a councillor for 10 years now and I’ve always worked hard for the people who have elected me. My attendance at county council is good.”
He added: “My home is still in Prudhoe and I continue to serve my residents as always.”

But Labour Leader Grant Davey dismissed the proposal as ‘the Tories’ long-term aim to lower the pay of the men and women in the northern region.’

Tory call for performance pay rejected


A CONSERVATIVE call for performance-related pay at Northumberland County Council has been decisively rejected.
Conservative Group Leader Peter Jackson suggested it could raise the wages of the lowest paid, who had been asked to take on more responsibility as the number of workers had been cut.
But Labour Leader Grant Davey dismissed the proposal as ‘the Tories’ long-term aim to lower the pay of the men and women in the northern region.’
Independent Paul Kelly argued for a ‘living wage’.
He said: “We live in a society where the very, very rich can flaunt their wealth without any embarrassment and without any sanction from central government.
“And we have people who are on the streets through no fault of their own, who have fallen there as a result of losing their jobs and who have been unable to manage their meagre budgets.
“And it should be the case that in this country we have an enlightened view of what is dignity in work.”
Conservative John Riddle said: “Some of our lowest-paid staff are under attack in their wages, but when it snows they are the people who are asked to turn out.”
Coun Jackson’s amendment was lost by 36 votes to 18, with six abstentions.
The annual pay policy review was approved by 44 votes to 14.